Modernism Gallery

Americas first and premier online gallery specializing in authentic period art deco furniture, lighting and accessories.

Art Deco Chandeliers & Ceiling Lights

Art Deco Rugs Tapestries and Textiles

Art Deco – Art – Design MODERNISM Books

American Art Deco Furniture By Ric Emmett Valentines Price

American Art Deco Furniture by Ric Emmett After FOUR years of research and writing this book has become a REALITY!!! It has become a part of the permanent collection in the Art & Design Libraries in many museums and universities. 200 copies were sold in the pre-publication offer!!! The book; Five hundred and sixty-nine pages of color pictures (none previously published), descriptions and period research has become the bible on the subject. It has chapters on Paul Frankl, Donald Deskey, Gilbert Rohde, Kem Weber and nineteen other American designers of the Art Deco period. The book includes chapters on manufacturers, a useful bibliography and a chapter showing tags, marks and labels. American Art Deco Furniture is published in an edition of only 1000. Each book is numbered. There will be NO second edition or any other printing or e-book publication. The book price is $ 150.00 plus local sales taxes if applicable. You may also send a check for $ 150.00 (add 7 % if located in Florida) along with your address to: Art Deco Pros., Inc. 7125 SW 47 303 Miami, FL 33155. Shipping included. Iza Emmett (305) 798-0308

download a great article in the summer issue of Modern Magazine.

WOODS OF THE WORLD AS USED IN AMERICAN ART DECO FURNITURE DESIGN & MANUFACTURE In his book, American Art Deco Furniture, Ric Emmett describes the use of exotic woods in the design of furniture by the great American Designers. This guide was published in the Home Furnishing Arts magazines Spring & Summer issue of 1935.

Eugene Schoen (1880 – 1957) was one of American Art Decos top design names. The following is an excerpt from Ric Emmetts new book, American Art Deco Furniture: Eugene Schoen (1880-1957) was born in New York City. He attended Colum¬bia University, graduating in 1901 with a degree in architecture. The Paris Exposition of 1925 inspired him to open an interior decorating business specializing in the new modern movement. He designed furniture, rugs, and occasional items for his cli¬ents. His work was exhibited at The Metropolitan Museum of Arts two exhibits of industrial design. Schoen had a wealthy clientele and his combination of the best of New York, Paris, and Vienna with the quality of craftsmanship of his furniture, mostly executed by Schmieg, Hungate, and Kotzian, brought him ample commissions through the depression. He maintained his exclusivity by selling through other decorators or to his own clients.

The Miami Design Preservation League made it happen! The FIRST Miami Beach Art Deco Museum openend on October 1st. It is located at the MDPL Welcome Center at 10th Street and Ocean Drive in Miami Beach. Admission is free! Modernism Gallery provided, on loan and for sale with a portion of the proceeds going to the MDPL, several pieces of furniture including a pair of French art deco leather club chairs, a seafoam green seahorse coffee table, a collection of graphics from the 1925 Paris Exposition (for which ART DECO was named), a KEM Weber sofa and chair set and many other items including French, Belgian, English and American Art Deco ceramics. Click here for additional information:

This American art deco desk lamp from the 1930s was manufactured by theMarkelCompany of Buffalo, New York. The rectangular black composition base is highlighted by speed stripes. The pivoting shade supports finials and stepped up light switch all speak of the periods fascination with the machine. The lamp has been rewired. It measures 11 high and 12 wide. Weve had several variations of this lamp in the past so were happy that this one came our way!

This American art deco table lamp is from the 1930s. It was designed by Edward Kent for the Railley Company, Cleveland Ohio. Constructed of black enameled and highly polished aluminum, the lamp is a testimony to the machine age. The downward slope of the three graduated shades is repeated in reverse with the finial. The black enameled shaft is split by three polished aluminum rings. The interior of the bottom shade is painted white to reflect light for reading or work. The diffused light from the next two shades is colored by red and green painted interiors. The lamp is 18 High, has been rewired and is in excellent condition.

Kurt Versen(1901-1942) designed this table lamp for Kurt Versen Inc. New York ca 1935. The lamp has a circular chrome base, an offset chrome support with chrome ball on top and two chrome arms which hold a round aluminum shade which swivels up and down to direct light where it is needed. A chrome finial tops the shade. The lamp is 14 high.

This American art deco nickel plated desk lamp was made by the  Markel Corporation of Buffalo, New York. The base weight is formed with Markel Electric Prod.  Inscribed. The two piece shade with a stacked top of three discs is surmounted by a three step finial with a ball on top. A S shaped support links the shade to the round base. The lamp is 14 tall.

This American art deco nickel plated desk lamp was manufactured in the 1930s by the Markel Corporation of Buffalo, New York. The speed era is represented in the lamp with raised speed lines on the bottom and stepped rings on the top of the swiveling shade. The base has incised speed lines around a stepped shaft with three ray gun disks. An art deco stepped finial sits atop the lamp. The lamp is 14 tall

This American art deco table or desk lamp is from the 1930s. The lamp has a copper stepped base and shade and a chrome switch housing, support and finial. It has the markel blue metallic tag on the bottom and has been rewired and polished. The lamp is 14 tall

This smart 1930s American art deco table lamp would fit in about any room dcor. The lamp features a flat chrome base and a chrome circle, which supports a circular disk of solid mahogany. A matching chrome circle sits atop the mahogany and three vertical chrome speed lines connect the two. The lamp has its original stepped finial and a new linen shade. It is 22 high, has been rewired and is in excellent condition.

This rare table lamp was designed byKurt Versen(1901 1942) for the Kurt Versen Company in 1935.  The base and shade are covered in cork and the shaft and support are in polished copper.  The shade swings out from the shaft to provide a wider range of light on the surface.  The lamp is 16 ½ high, 10 wide and 18 long.  It is in excellent original condition with only the copper polished.  The lamp has been rewired.

This 1930s French art deco table or mood lamp is from the 1930s. The lamp is constructed from two demilune pieces of pale alabaster decorated on the front with three chrome balls and three smaller chrome balls. The lamp has been rewired for American electricity. It is 16 wide, 3 ½ deep and 8 high.

This pair of American art deco tube lamps are from the 1930s. The lamps have a marble base sitting on three chrome feet, a chrome and black metal structure and milk glass shade. The three sky scraper finals on each lamp add a futuristic touch. The lamps are 15 tall and have been rewired.

This pair of Austrian art deco table lamps are from the early 1930s. The white marble shaft sits on an ebonized wood base which matches the wood finial. The hand made ribbed linen shades are typical of the country and period. The lamps are each 17 tall and 6 in diameter (at the bottom of the shade). They have been rewired for American electricity.

This American art deco bright nickel table lamp was manufactured in the 1930s by theMarkelCorporation in Buffalo, New York. At 14 high it is taller than its little brother (TL 013). It has a domed base and the support is more curved. Both dome shades also are different. The lamp has been replated and rewired.

This pair of Flash Gordon styled table lamps was designed in 1936 by Bert A Dickerson for the Faries Manufacturing Company, Decatur, Illinois. The lamps, which are of superior quality, are finished in bright nickel and are in excellent condition. The 17 tall lamps have a shade that is 13 in diameter. The lamps have been rewired Price: $2,900 the pair

This very geometric 1930s French art deco table lamp features a quadripod base and ribbed column with four thumb screw shade holders.  TheMuller FreresMuller Freres

(Muller Brothers) in Luneville, France, was one of the premier glassmakers of the period. The Mullers produced art glass competing with Daum and Galle from 1895 till the war intervened in 1914. Resuming production in 1919, the company concentrated on ceiling fixtures, wall sconces and table lamps. The Depression caused Muller Freres to cease production in 1933 and finally close down in 1936.

frosted glass shade is their rarest and most geometricwith buttresses, setbacks and a domed top it was probably hard to cast.  The shade is signed Muller Freres, Luneville.  The lamp is 11 ½ high.

This large American art deco table lamp was made by theMarkelCompany of Buffalo, New York in the 1930s.  The lamp, in brilliant nickel, has a stepped base, speed disks in the central shaft and a double shade with the distinct Markel finial on top.  The lamp has been replated and rewired and ready for your desk or table.  The lamp is 23 high and 15 diameter

This French art deco table lamp was made by the Paris, France firm Jumo in the 1940s.  The black Bakelite base has five sets of three raised lines as dcor and a white plastic switch.  The black Bakelite shaft starts with a round cylinder and then spreads upward with raised wings.  The metal shade and cup are in cream lacquer.  A copper ring separates the base and the shaft, a copper fitting holds the cup and a copper finial is on the top.  The lamp, which is 18 high and 17 in diameter is in good original condition, except for being rewired for US electricity.

This 1930s French art deco hand wrought iron and acid etched glass lamp is ideal for use on a desk or occasional table. From its triangular base the three sided column rises with three sections on each side, each section worked in a circle within a circle, the circles staggered. At each corner of the base is a support with curled ends which support the shade. The frosted glass shade is acid etched with vertical stripes ending in a series of circles on the top. Overall, the lamp is 15 ½ high, the shade is 7 high and 10 in diameter.

This streamline American art deco bright nickel table lamp was manufactured by theMarkelCorporation of Buffalo, New York in the 1930s. The lamp features a base with two discs and a swiveling double shade which directs a pool of light for reading and an upper shade which allows a diffused light to emit. The lamp is 12 high, has been replated and rewired.

This Italian art deco table lamp was designed in 1934 by Paolo Venini (1895 1959) for Vetri Soffiati Muranesi Venini & Co., which he founded in 1925. From his Diamante line of artistic glass, the twisted, spiraling crystal glass base supports a custom silk shade which emulates the base and a glass finial. Rewired for US electricity, the lamp is 29 tall. The base measures 8 wide and 3 deep.

This nickel plated table lamp was designed byWalter Von Nessen(1889 1943) for the Miller Lamp Company in the 1930s. The two tier Pagoda style shade is topped by an opalescent glass finial. The lamp is stamped on the bottom The Miller Co and numbered 31034. It has been rewired and measures 14 high and 9 diameter.

This very large and striking American Art Deco Bankers desk lamp is the absolute best Bankers lamp I have ever seen! The nickel shade is supported by two square curving bands that lift the shade up from the square rectangular base. The base has ridges for your pens or pencils. A similar lamp appears in the movie Carlitos Way on Al Pacinos desk. It will be featured in the book, American Art Deco Lighting which is in the works at this time. Measures: 16 high x 18 1/2 wide x 6 deep. Rewired and is ready for use!

An American desk lamp reminiscent ofGilbert RohdeGilbert Rohde

Gilbert Rohde was one of the pioneers of American Modern design. Starting in the late 1920s, Rohde designed furniture for clients and his own furniture retailed by others. In 1930 he designed a line of furniture for Heywood Wakefield and beginning in 1930 until 1944 he designed for Herman Miller Company, using a variety of new materials and techniques. While Rohde designed for several other furniture manufacturers his work for Herman Miller remains his best work and some of the best work of the period. Rohdes designs for clocks for the Herman Miller Company and lamps for the Mutual Sunset Lamp Company are classics of the Art Deco era. ***We are actively buying Gilbert Rohde furniture as well as other top designers and art deco furniture from the period.  Please contact us if you are wishing to sell.*** Contact Us: (305) 442-8743

s (1894-1944) design, this lamp is definitely not by the great American Art Deco designer but it will add a great touch to any space needing a good light by which to read or write. The lamp has three brass tubes on the gray painted base which is one single brass tube curves a continuous up and holds the gray painted tubular shade which is adjustable and turns upward or downward. The lamp is 7 high x 12 ¼ length x 3 wide.

This American art deco table lamp is from the 1930s. The ball shaped body is copper with an array of seventeen brass stars affixed. Sitting on a copper painted wood foot, the lamp has a brass shaft which terminates in a copper finial. The two bulbs are controlled by two hanging brass chains. The lamp is 25 tall.

Gilbert Rohde was one of the pioneers of American Modern design. Starting in the late 1920s, Rohde designed furniture for clients and his own furniture retailed by others. In 1930 he designed a line of furniture for Heywood Wakefield and beginning in 1930 until 1944 he designed for Herman Miller Company, using a variety of new materials and techniques. While Rohde designed for several other furniture manufacturers his work for Herman Miller remains his best work and some of the best work of the period. Rohdes designs for clocks for the Herman Miller Company and lamps for the Mutual Sunset Lamp Company are classics of the Art Deco era. ***We are actively buying Gilbert Rohde furniture as well as other top designers and art deco furniture from the period.  Please contact us if you are wishing to sell.*** Contact Us: (305) 442-8743

(1894-1944) designed this American art deco table lamp for the Mutual Sunset Lamp Company, Brooklyn, New York in the 1930s. The square base has three sections divided by an indented line. On each side of the center brass shaft clear one inch diameter glass tubes catch the light from the original milk glass diffuser. All the metal parts are made of polished brass. The lamp is marked on the bottom MSLC (Mutual Sunset Lamp Company) and 4060 (the model number). We recently had a pair of the same design in brushed nickel with the number 4600…The difference being the type of metal. The lamp is 23 ½ tall and is in excellent condition. The shade is not original to the lamp.

This American art deco lamp was designed by Wolfgang (1900-1969) and Pola (1902-1984) Hoffmann ca. 1931. The impressive 24 tall lamp sits on an 8 chrome and black enamel base. The lamp has a revolving cylinder which is rotated by turning the ball finial on the topallowing a discrete light for reading or, a wall washing light to the rear or, by turning a switch on the base, no light at all. An early version of the lamp is pictured in the December 1931 issue of Creative Art where it is described as night reading lamp with movable shade designed by Wolfgang and Pola Hoffmann. The lamp is in excellent condition and has been rewired.

This sweet little American art deco table lamp is from the 1930s and bears a resemblance to Flash Gordons ray gun. The chrome base has three chrome rods held on with chrome balls. Three copper rings encircle the frosted glass tube which illuminates when the switch on the base is turned on. The lamp is 7 ½ high and 4 3/4 in diameter at the base. It is in excellent condition and has been rewired.

This large table lamp was designed by Walter von Nessen (1889 1943) for Nessen Studios ca. 1930.  The lamp has a round brass base with two stage brass structure holding two light sockets.  The burnt orange burlap shade has a brass conical shaped finial which holds the conical shade to the lamp base.  The lamps is 32 high and the shade is 24 in diameter at its widest.  The lamp is in original untouched condition.

This pair of American art deco table lamps was designed  byGilbert RohdeGilbert Rohde

Gilbert Rohde was one of the pioneers of American Modern design. Starting in the late 1920s, Rohde designed furniture for clients and his own furniture retailed by others. In 1930 he designed a line of furniture for Heywood Wakefield and beginning in 1930 until 1944 he designed for Herman Miller Company, using a variety of new materials and techniques. While Rohde designed for several other furniture manufacturers his work for Herman Miller remains his best work and some of the best work of the period. Rohdes designs for clocks for the Herman Miller Company and lamps for the Mutual Sunset Lamp Company are classics of the Art Deco era. ***We are actively buying Gilbert Rohde furniture as well as other top designers and art deco furniture from the period.  Please contact us if you are wishing to sell.*** Contact Us: (305) 442-8743

(1894 – 1944) for the Mutual Sunset Lamp Company, Brooklyn, New York in the 1930s. A four inch square base holds a vertical shaft and circle, all in brushed nickel. The base is horizontally divided  in three parts…the 1930s speed motif.  On each side of the central shaft clear one inch diameter solid clear glass tubes catch the light from the original milk glass diffuser. The beige linen type shades are new and the lamps have been rewired. The lamps are 23 ½ tall and are in excellent original condition. Each lamp is marked MSLC (Mutual Sunset lamp company) and 4600 (the model number)

One of the most desired American art deco table lamps!  This lamp, named Spirit of Modernism, was designed in 1928 by sculptor Arthur von Frankenberg (1898 1992) for his company, Frankart.  An unclothed young lady rises from a fantastic cityscape of skyscrapers and gazes to her right.  The spelter lamp is in its original gunmetal patina and is marked on the back Frankart and © 1928  the lamp was awarded design patent D77203 and is number L215 in the company literature.  The spelter portion of the lamp is 13 ½ tall.  The lamp has been rewired for safety.  The lamp is pictured in American Art Deco, page 70.

This classic French art deco table lamp is from the late 1920s. The hand wrought iron body has a domed base on four scroll feet. A ring of balls surround the vertical shafts which terminate in a collar in another ring of balls. Four arms support the frosted glass shade which is signed Muller FreresMuller Freres

(Muller Brothers) in Luneville, France, was one of the premier glassmakers of the period. The Mullers produced art glass competing with Daum and Galle from 1895 till the war intervened in 1914. Resuming production in 1919, the company concentrated on ceiling fixtures, wall sconces and table lamps. The Depression caused Muller Freres to cease production in 1933 and finally close down in 1936.

. The lamp is 13 high and is 6 in diameter. It is in excellent condition and has been rewired for American electricity.

This French art deco alabaster table lamp is from the 1930s. It will cast a special glow in any room. The lamp have been cleaned and rewired for American electricity. It measures 11 1/1 high.

This American art deco table light is from the 1930s. The circular light has 24 cobalt blue glass rods on a 5 diameter chrome base. Three chrome rods extend to a steped cap topped with a crystal ball. The lamp is mint condition and is 11 high.

This rare 1930s table lamp was designed byWalter Von Nessen(1899 – 1943). The black enamel double shade and shaft have chrome trim and sit on a black enamel domed base with chrome trim. Von Nessens signature glowing glass finial tops the lamp which is 9 in diameter.

This sweet American art deco desk lamp byGilbert RohdeGilbert Rohde

Gilbert Rohde was one of the pioneers of American Modern design. Starting in the late 1920s, Rohde designed furniture for clients and his own furniture retailed by others. In 1930 he designed a line of furniture for Heywood Wakefield and beginning in 1930 until 1944 he designed for Herman Miller Company, using a variety of new materials and techniques. While Rohde designed for several other furniture manufacturers his work for Herman Miller remains his best work and some of the best work of the period. Rohdes designs for clocks for the Herman Miller Company and lamps for the Mutual Sunset Lamp Company are classics of the Art Deco era. ***We are actively buying Gilbert Rohde furniture as well as other top designers and art deco furniture from the period.  Please contact us if you are wishing to sell.*** Contact Us: (305) 442-8743

sits on a block of Brazilian rosewood.  The 7 ¼ diameter dome is nestled in a support of square tubing.  The wood has been refinished in high gloss lacquer, the metal re-nickel plated and the light rewired.  The lamp is 14 high and 7 ½ deep.

This very rare and important American art deco table lamp was designed in the early 1930s byKurt Versen(1901 1942).  The lamp, virtually hand made, with its domed shade and flat thin base precedes the model advertised by him in the November 1934 Art & Decoration magazinethe copper domed shade has given way to a less expensive shade of cork or Toyo Paper.  The support is 1 bronze tubing.  The lamp has its original socket and works well.  We have resisted the temptation to polish off almost eighty years of patina.  The lamp is 16 ¼ high and the shade is 10 diameter.

This American art deco reading lamp was designed in the 1930s by the industrial designer Norman Bel Geddes (1893 1958) for the Faries Manufacturing Company of Decatur, Illinois.  Called The Cobra Lamp and made of stunning polished copper, the lamp has a unique reflector shade which hides the bulb and causes the light to shine up and be reflected down from the white underside of the shade.  The arrangement makes for a superb reading lamp without the glare of the bulb.  The lamp has been polished, coated with clear lacquer and rewired.  It measures 12 high and 11 diameter.

This American art deco table lamp dates from the 1920s and looks like it may have been on a corner of Dr. Zarkovs desk.  Black lacquer, bright nickel and a lemon yellow glass tube with black speed rings.  The lamp has been replated, rewired and ready for your home.  It measures 15 ¼ tall.

Walter Von Nessen(1889-1943) designed this brass American art deco table lamp for the Miller Lamp Company in the 1930s.  It features a two tier pagoda style shade with an opalescent peach glass finial.  The lamp is 9 in diameter and is 12 high.

This rare American art deco table lamp is by theMarkelCorporation of Buffalo, New York and is from the 1930s.  The lamp features a stepped base and a curved support in bright nickel.  The nickel housing and flaring shade are separated by 24 amber glass rods.  When illuminated, the light flows out of the adjustable shade and a warm amber glow emanates through the rods.  The lamp is 13 ½ high and has been rewired.

Manufactured by theMarkelCorporation of Buffalo, New York in the 1930s.   This streamline American art deco table lamp features a base with two discs and a swiveling double shade which directs a pool of light for reading and an upper shade which allows a diffused light to emit.  The lamp is 12 high and has been rewired.

This sleek American art deco table lamp dates from the 1930s and was made by theMarkelCorporation of Buffalo, New York. The nickel plated lamp has two flaring cone shaped shades suspended from a slanting supportand of course the Markel finial. Replated and rewired, the 16 tall lamp is ready for table or desk!

This French art deco table lamp dates from the 1920s. The triangular wrought iron base supports a central shaft decorated with vines and leaves. The swirls on the base are repeated at the top. The double dome glass shade is signed Daum Nancy France with the Cross of Lorraine. The shade is orange and yellow in reflected light and a wonderful sunset/sunrise color of pink and palest of green in transmitted light (when the light is turned on). The lamp stands 20 high.

This French wrought iron table lamp with cameo glass shade byCharles SchneiderCharles Schneider

In 1913, Charles Schneider and his brother established the Cristallerie Schneider at Epnay-sur-Seine, France. Charles had learned his trade as a designer for the great Art Nouveau glass firms of Galle and Daum. Art glass by Schneider was originally signed Schneider, Le Verre Francaise, or Charder (a contraction of Charles Schneider). Occasionally, it was signed with the inclusion of a small candy-cane of striped glass in the base. The glass marked Schneider was produced from 1913 to 1933 in a variety of shapes and colors, including a new deep orange, which Schneider developed in 1926 and called Tango. This orange became so popular a color that it was copied in other mediums. The glass that Schneider produced marked Le Verre Francais (the glass of France), and Charder, was made of two contrasting layers of colored glass. Part of the outer layer was cut away in various Art Deco motifs by acid etching, to reveal the…

(1881 1962) is from the late 1920s. The glass shade has a blue overlay acid etched to reveal a lemon yellow ground. The double C shaft is adjustable to direct the light at will. Rewired for American electricity, it measures 15 ½ high and 17 long. The shade is signed Le Verre Francais.

This French art deco table lamp dates from the late 1920s and features a nickel base and a C support. The shade which graduates from lavender to pink is signed Schneider and was blown in the Atelier ofCharles SchneiderCharles Schneider

In 1913, Charles Schneider and his brother established the Cristallerie Schneider at Epnay-sur-Seine, France. Charles had learned his trade as a designer for the great Art Nouveau glass firms of Galle and Daum. Art glass by Schneider was originally signed Schneider, Le Verre Francaise, or Charder (a contraction of Charles Schneider). Occasionally, it was signed with the inclusion of a small candy-cane of striped glass in the base. The glass marked Schneider was produced from 1913 to 1933 in a variety of shapes and colors, including a new deep orange, which Schneider developed in 1926 and called Tango. This orange became so popular a color that it was copied in other mediums. The glass that Schneider produced marked Le Verre Francais (the glass of France), and Charder, was made of two contrasting layers of colored glass. Part of the outer layer was cut away in various Art Deco motifs by acid etching, to reveal the…

(1882 1962). The lamp has been replated and rewired. The height is 13, the shade is 9 in diameter and the square base is 5 ½ to each side. (the lighted photo is for the details).

This American art deco table lamp was designed and produced in the 1930s by theMarkelCompany of Buffalo, New York. The three speed rings on the shaft are echoed in the typical Markel finial. This is the largest and most impressive of the Markel table lamps. The lamp has been replated in bright nickel and rewired. It measures 18 high and 15 in diameter.

These classic American art deco table torchieres or uplighters date from the 1930s. The lamps sit on an ebonized wood base with a nickel shaft containing three Lucite rings. The top has a high gloss enamel outside and a white interior for greater reflectivity. The lamps are 17-1/2 high with an 8 diameter top. The bases are 8 on each side.

Seven very deco fish populate this 1930s French art deco luminaire. Three glass slabs etched with fish and bubbles sit on footed nickel bronze bases. The center glass is illuminated from below and has been rewired for American electricity. The illuminated piece measures 9-1/2 high by 8 wide and 2 deep. The other two each measure 6-3/4 high by 9 wide and are 2 deep.

This American art deco table lamp was designed and produced in the 1930s by theMarkelCompany of Buffalo, New York. The three speed rings on the shaft are echoed in the typical Markel finial. The lamp has been replated in bright nickel and rewired. It measures 18 high and 15 in diameter.

This rare and unusual American art deco table lamp was made by theMarkelCompany of Buffalo, New York.